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Metabolomics approach to assess the effect of siphonal autotomy on metabolic characteristics of razor clam Solen grandis
Wu, Y.; Chen, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Cao, Y.; Chen, S.; Tian, Z.; Li, Q. (2022). Metabolomics approach to assess the effect of siphonal autotomy on metabolic characteristics of razor clam Solen grandis. NPG Scientific Reports 12: 5528. https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-09562-6
In: Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group). Nature Publishing Group: London. ISSN 2045-2322; e-ISSN 2045-2322, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Solen grandis Dunker, 1862 [WoRMS]
    Marine/Coastal

Authors  Top 
  • Wu, Y.
  • Chen, A.
  • Zhang, Y., more
  • Zhang, Z.
  • Cao, Y.
  • Chen, S.
  • Tian, Z.
  • Li, Q.

Abstract
    Autotomy appendages are fundamental evolutionary adaptations to escape predation. The siphon is an important foraging organ for bivalves. Here, we report the first demonstration of autotomy of the siphon in marine bivalves (razor clam Solen grandis) and the effect of siphonal autotomy in S. grandis on foraging and metabolic characteristics. In this study, the feeding rate and digestive enzyme activities upon siphonal autotomy in razor clams were investigated. Moreover, endogenous metabolites pre/post-autotomy of the siphon were investigated using liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC–MS). The feeding rate and digestive enzyme activities decreased significantly after siphonal autotomy in S. grandis (P < 0.05), suggesting that autotomy of the siphon negatively affected its foraging. These results might be related to the reduction in the foraging radius. Additionally, the effect of autotomy was investigated on a total of 34 differentially abundant metabolites, and pathway analysis indicated that 32 differentially enriched metabolic pathways were worthy of attention. Further integrated key metabolic pathway analysis showed that glycine, serine and threonine metabolism; taurine and hypotaurine metabolism; biotin metabolism; vitamin B6 and thiamine metabolism were significantly relevant pathways in S. grandis pre/post-autotomy of the siphon. The downregulation of glycine, taurine, and hypotaurine is expected to indicate a shortage of intermediate compounds and energy in S. grandis. Therefore, to provide the required energy and materials for siphon regeneration in S. grandis, we anticipated that it would be necessary to supplement these as exogenous metabolites from the daily diet.

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